Using Microsoft Project

| November 30, 2016

Application: Using Microsoft Project

Starting a project without a plan is like going on a road trip without any directions. You may progress along the way, but you might not end up at your desired destination. A project plan provides basic information that guides the execution and control of the project. At its most fundamental level, a project plan will describe the “who, what, when, and why” of a project. Microsoft Project is one of the most widely used project planning tools. The ability to understand and create project plans in Microsoft Project enables a project manager to effectively plan and manage project implementations.

In this Assignment, you generate a project plan using Microsoft Project.

To prepare:

Review the information in this week’s Learning Resources on using Microsoft Project.
Consider how to efficiently schedule tasks in a project plan.
Think about how you should sequence tasks that have dependencies.

To complete this Assignment, you will create a Microsoft Project plan for a patient information management system. The primary deliverable for the plan is the patient information management system itself, but it is comprised of many modules. Include the following tasks, subtasks, and timeframes:

1) Create the Admission, Discharge, and Transfer Module (requires subtask I, configuration period: 25 days, training period: 10 days)

2) Subtask I: Create the Patient Registration Module (requires subtask II, configuration period: 4 days, training period: 4 days)

3) Subtask II: Create the Master Patient Index (configuration period: 4 days)

4) Subtask III: Create the Patient Scheduling Module (requires subtask II, configuration period: 7 days, training period: 15 days)

Required Readings

Biafore, B. (2010). Microsoft Project 2010: The missing manual. Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly.

Chapter 2, “Planning a Project” (pp. 39–57)

This chapter supplies a brief introduction on project planning. The chapter describes the contents of a project plan along with the process of creating relevant documents.

Coplan, S., & Masuda, D. (2011). Project management for healthcare information technology. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Chapter 5, “Change Management” (pp. 193–237)

In this chapter, the authors review change management knowledge areas. The authors describe a variety of analysis methods applicable to change management processes and outputs.

Project Management Institute. (2013). A guide to the project management body of knowledge (PMBOK guide) (5th ed.). Newtown Square, PA: Author.

Chapter 3, “Project Management Processes” (pp. 47–61)

This chapter supplies information on managing a project that uses networked processes. The chapter describes project management processes related to each phase of a project.

Campbell, R. J. (2008). Change management in health care. The Health Care Manager, 27(1), 23–39.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

In this article, the author highlights the work of two leaders in the field of change management. The author demonstrates how the work of these leaders can be applied to health care organizations.

Merrell, P. (2012). Effective change management: The simple truth. Management Services, 56(2), 20–23.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

In this article, the author provides six steps for effective change management. The author also supplies supplementary information on the importance of learning activities, measuring success, and managing change management strategies.

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013a). Establishing a team [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 8 minutes.

In this video, Dr. Mimi Hassett discusses important considerations when assembling a project team, such as who to include and whom to consult. She talks about how project size, goals, and timelines can impact those decisions, and she also offers examples of how to keep enthusiasm for a project moving forward as the challenges toward completion arise.

Schifalacqua, M., Costello, C., & Denman, W. (2009). Roadmap for planned change, part 1: Change leadership and project management. Nurse Leader, 7(2), 26–29.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

In this article, the authors explore the essential elements of change theory and project management. The article details many tools and concepts that assist in managing and planning change at various scales.

Microsoft Corporation. (2012). Getting started: Introduction to project management. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/project-help/getting-started-introduction-to-project-management-HA010359477.aspx?CTT=3

Review this web page, which provides an overview of basic project management concepts. It also provides links to other pages which demonstrate how to apply the aforementioned concepts in Microsoft Project 2010.

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