on attactment PAGE 9; QUESTION 3. 2000words dont worry about other questions.

| February 14, 2018

Unit Name.jpg”>
Session

102037­Perspectives
in Criminology Autumn
2014
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LEARNING GUIDE

School of Social Sciences and
Psychology
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Please read this
document and the accompanying SSAPguide
very carefully for everything you need to know about the unit.

If you need help,
check both (and your unit vUWS site) first. If you still need help, please
contact us as per Section 2.1 of the SSAPguide.

Unit Weekly ScheduleFollows on next page
for your convenience

Section 1: Unit Information


Unit
code and name


Unit
coordinator


Credit
points


Teaching
session


Welcome
and key contacts


Consultation
arrangements


Requirements
other than those listed below


Improvements
made recently to unit


Delivery:
How unit is delivered


Attendance
requirements


Textbook


Essential
readings


Other
resources


Referencing
requirements
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Section 2: Assessment Information


Course
learning outcomes


Unit
learning outcomes


How
unit outcomes relate to course outcomes


Assessment
summary


Assessment
details: Full details for each assessment item

Section 3: Learning and Teaching
Activities See Page 2

Section 4: Learning Resources See Section 1 for Texbook, Readings etc.


Literacy and/or numeracy resources

Section 5: Expectations Of and By
You SeeSSAPguide

UNIT REQUIREMENTS

Internet Access:You must have internet
access for this unit, preferably high speed broadband (or use University facilities) vUWS:You must access the unit vUWS site at
least twice a week to check for any new content or announcements

iPad:Owning an iPad is
strongly recommended, as some units are optimised for iPad

FREE ADOBE READER:This Learning Guide is an
Adobe PDF document with internal attachments. To access attachments you may
needto download and open it in
latest FREE Adobe Reader, available at http://get.adobe.com/reader/

You MUST use free Adobe reader app
to access attachments on iPad.

Autumn Schedule >>>

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 1

Unit
Weekly Schedule

(Link to Handbook and
timetable for unit:http://handbook.uws.edu.au/hbook/unit.aspx?unit=101184.2)

Week Starts

Lecture

Tutorial

Reading
And Assessments

1

Introduction to
Perspectives

Garland and Sparks (2000)

No tutorials in week
1.

and

24/2/2014

in Criminology

Garland (2001)

2

Globalisation and the

Consider the
changing international context for crime and

Gillespie (2006)

Changing Nature
of Criminal

and

3/3/2014

criminal justice
along with key terms and concepts.

Justice

Aas (2013)

3

Neoliberalism,

O’Malley (2008)

Responsibilisation and

Explore
neoliberalism and its impact on crime and criminal

and

10/3/2014

Shifting Forms of Crime

justice.

Muncie (2005)

Prevention

4

Sovereignty,
Transnational

Focus on the extent, nature and
impact of transnational

McCulloch (2007)

Crime and the
Impact of its

crime. Evaluate counter­measures used
to combat

and

17/3/2014

Counter­measures

transnational crime.

Pickering (2004)

5

Law and Order Trends

Kraska (2007)

Discuss police
paramilitarisation and law and order politics.

and

24/3/2014

Hogg and Brown (1996)

6

Corporate Crime
and Crimes

Consider the different state
responses to coroporate and

White (2005)

and

31/3/2014

against the Environment

environmental crimes.

Friedrichs (2007)

Young (1999)

Discuss the nature
of crime in the context of city­space and

and

7

Crime, Space and Social

Martin (2011)

the exclusionary
practices which are often a bi­product of

7/4/2014

Exclusion

ASSESSMENT 1:
Research

state crime­prevention policy.

Exercise due 5:00pm
on

Friday
11 April, 2014. Submit

via Turnitin.

8

SESSION BREAK NO LECTURES OR TUTORIALS

14/4/2014

9

State Crimes, War Crimes

Focus on
nation­states as violators of human rights in an

Grewcock (2008)

and

21/4/2014

and Crimes Against
Humanity

international framework.

Green and Ward (2004)

10

Torture and Detention

Consider the use of torture in an
international context.

Stanley (2008)

Describe the
nature and impact of global prison trends and

and

28/4/2014

Without Trial

the movement towards indefinite
detention of prisoners.

Pratt (1995)

11

Privatisation and
the Growth

Explore the
contemporary trend towards the privatisation

Pratt (2008)

and

5/5/2014

of Criminal Justice

of policing and prisons.

Loader (2000)

Explore the ‘war
on terror’ and discuss what it has meant

Michaelson (2012)

12

Terrorism and Counter­

for the
nation­state and criminal justice agencies. Can you

and

see the emergence of any particular
ideologies in state­

12/5/2014

terrorism

McCulloch and Pickering

responses? What agenda might rest
behind their

(2009)

emergence?

13

Global Criminal Justice

Consider the role
and function of the International Criminal

Findlay (2008)

19/5/2014

Administration

Court and War Crime Tribunal and
their effectiveness.

and

Kwon (2007)

14

ASSESSMENT 2:
Research

No Lecture

No Tutorials

Essay due 5pm Monday
26

26/5/2014

May, 2014. Submit
via

Turnitin.

15

STUVAC Student exam study vacation

2/6/2014

16­18

FORMAL EXAMINATION PERIOD

9/6/2014

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or Learning
Guide Page 2

SECTION
ONE: Unit Information

Unit Number

102037

Unit Name

102037­Perspectives
in Criminology

Unit Coordinator

Phillip
Wadds

Credit Points

10

Session

Autumn 2014

Key Contacts

Contemporary
criminological knowledge typically concerns explanations of

offending,
victimisation, prevention and safety, but debates about these matters

also
reflect unequal power, social division and exclusion. The unit will focus on
the

criminological
concern with individual offenders and the implications of this for

responses
to crimes including those of the powerful. Additionally, it will analyse

the
impacts of the blurred lines between the public and private, the national and

global,
citizens and aliens, as well as evidence about the expansion of more

intensive forms of
policing and surveillance in contemporary societies.

Consultation

Teaching staff:

Lecturer: Dr. Phillip Wadds

Tutors:Dr. Phillip Wadds

Bridget Mottram

Chris Joyce

Contact
and Consultation: Student consultation is by appointment via email with

Dr. Phillip Wadds

Location:Bankstown Campus
(room 1.G.35)

Email:p.wadds@uws.edu.au

Improvements

Please
note that your feedback is important – you will have an opportunity to help

us improve this
subject by providing feedback at the end of the semester.

Requirements

Delivery

The unit is
delivered by means of:

Lecture:1 hour per week
online (except for week 1)

Tutorial:1 hour per week
face­to­face

Online Activity:1 hour per week

Attendance

Students
are expected to watch all online lectures and attend all tutorials, to have

completed
all readings and required activities prior to class, and to participate

actively in all
tutorial activities,. Failure to do so may seriously undermine a

student’s
ability to complete the unit satisfactorily. Attendance records may be

consulted in the
assessment of any requests for extensions or Special

Consideration.
You should advise the Unit Coordinator or your tutor if you are

unable to attend a
tutorial due to illness or misadventure.

A professional
standard of behaviour is required at all times in tutorials.

This
unit is worth 10 credit points, indicating that success in the unit requires
at

least
10 hours work per week. Three hours will be lecture/tutorial time and the

remaining 7 hours
should be devoted to reading and study, assessment

preparation, and
revision.

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 3

.gif”>Textbook

Given the breadth
of content in this unit, no single text will be used this semester.

Instead, a list of readings will be
provided on vUWS.

Readings

Other Resources

Additional
Readings:

Agamben, G. (1998)
‘The logic of sovereignty’, inHomo Sacer: Sovereign
Power and

Bare Life.Stanford: Stanford
University Press, pp. 4­46.

Brown, D. (2008) ‘Giving Voice: The
prisoner and discursive citizenship’, in T.

Anthony and C.
Cunneen (eds),The Critical Criminology Companion,
Leichhardt:

Hawkins Press, pp 228­239.

Christie, N.
(2000) ‘Dangerous States’, in M. Brown and J. Pratt (eds) Dangerous

Offenders:
Punishment and social order. London, Routledge.

Cohen, S. (2006)
‘State Crimes of Previous Regimes: Knowledge, Accountability, and

the Policing of the Past’,Law and Social
Inquiry,
20(1): pp. 7­50.

Findlay, M.
(1999) The Globalisation of Crime. Cambridge, Cambridge University

Press.

Foucalt, M. (2003)
‘Security, territory and population’, in P. Rainbow and N. Rose

(eds)The Essential
Foucault.
New York, The New Press, pp. 259­261.

Foucault, M.
(2003) ‘Confronting Governments: Human Rights’, P. Rainbow and N.

Rose (eds)The Essential
Foucault.
New York, The New Press, pp.64­65.

Garland, D. (1996)
‘The Limits of the Sovereign State: Strategies of crime control in

contemporary society,British Journal of
Criminology,
36(4), pp. 445­471.

Lister, S. (2008)
‘Painting the Town Blue: The pluralisation of policing’, Criminal

Justice Matters,63(1): pp. 22­23.

Hills, S., and
Berger, R. (2009) ‘A paramilitary policing juggernaught’, Social Justice,

36(1): pp. 25­40.

Hubbard, P. ‘Fear
and loathing at the multiplex: everyday anxiety in the post­

industrial city’, Capital and
Class, 27: pp. 51­7.

Massari, M. (2003) ‘Transnational
organised crime between myth and reality

­ the social
construction of threat’, in F. Allum and R. Siebert (eds) Organised

Crime and the
Challenge of Democracy.New York, Routledge, pp. 112­126.

Michalowski, R. (2009) ‘Power, crime
and criminology in the new imperial

age’,Crime, Law and
Social Change,
51(3­4), pp. 303­325.

McCulloch, J and Tham, J. (2005)
‘Secret State, transparent subject: The

Australian security intelligence
organisation in the age of terror’,The

Australian and New
Zealand Journal of Criminology,38(3):pp. 400­415.

Sudbury, J. (2000) ‘Transatlantic
visions: Resisting the globalisation of mass

incarceration’,Social Justice, 27(3): pp. 133­149.

Wood, J., and Kempa, M. (2005)
‘Understanding global trends in policing:

explanatory and normative
dimensions’, in J. Sheptycki and A Wardak (eds),

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 4

Transnational and Comparative Criminology.London, Glasshouse, pp. 287­316.

Zedner, L. (2003) ‘Too much
security’,International Journal of the Sociology of

Law,31 (3):
pp. 155­184.
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Referencing

The referencing requirement for units in
Social Science is the Harvard style. Full details on the Harvard style of
referencing can be found at:http://library.uws.edu.au/FILES/cite_Harvard.pdf
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Unit Number

102037

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102037

Section 2
>>>

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School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 5

SECTION TWO: Assessment Information

Course Outcomes

Click
on this link to see the course­level learning outcomes (or graduate
attributes)

you need to have
attained when you graduate: http://tinyurl.com/ssapclo

Unit Outcomes

After
successful completion of this Unit, students will be able to:

1. Apply a critical understanding of the
recent perspectives in criminology to

related debates
about power and exclusion;

2. Demonstrate knowledge of white collar,
corporate/transnational, state

crime and crimes against nature/the
environment;

3.
Describe and use different theoretical models of understanding state

power and
criminal justice.

Unit to Course

This
unit and its unit outcomes relate to the learning outcomes of the course as

shown
in the relevant Table of the Course Outcomes link above.

Assessment

Assessment
Overview:

Assessment

Worth

Length

Outcomes

Threshold

1

Research Exercise

40%

1,000 words

1, 2

No

2

Research Essay

60%

2,000 words

1, 2,3

No

Unit Code

102037

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Assessment 1
>>>

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 6

ASSESSMENT
ONE
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A1 Assessment

RESEARCH Exercise (1,000 Words)
Worth: 40%

A1 Due

BEFORE Friday 11 April, 2014, 5:00
PM

A1 Submission

Submission:

This
assignment is to be submitted and will be returned via the Turnitin link on
vUWS. There is no

hardcopy
submission.

Late Penalty:

If the assignment
is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due date and time, it
will

attract a late
penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at
which

time the penalty
will be 100% of what the assignment is worth. Assessments will not be
accepted

after the marked
assessment task has been returned to students who submitted the task on time.

Also see section
on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached
Social

Science Student Resources document.

Is assessment
compulsory?

Yes, you must
complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as
explained in

Section 5) regardless of the
aggregate mark you achieve across assessments.

A1 Description

Select one of the following recent
crime issues and answer the related question.

1.
Alcohol­related
violence and one­punch killings

a)
How can public debate and political action
relating to these offences be seen as related to neoliberal ideology? Discuss
in relation to concepts of risk and responsibilisation.

2.
International
people smuggling

a) How
can this issue be seen as related to processes of globalisation? Discuss in
relation to permeability of national borders and contemporary anxieties about
national identity.

References / Readings:


Please
note that for this assignment you are required to cite at least 6 academic

references. Note: Wikipedia,
lecture notes and media articles are NOT academic references. If you do use
media articles, these will be considered in addition to your required
references.

Students are strongly encouraged to extend
their research to additional readings. Please visit the library website for
literacy resources.


Assessment
guidance will be provided in tutorials.
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A1 Criteria
Marking rubric, standards
& criteria

Your work will be marked according to
the following criteria:


Your
ability to address the essay question;


The
clarity and sophistication of argument;


Evidence
of having read and understood relevant literature;


Evidence
of critical thinking and engagement with theory;


Ability
to write clearly and reference appropriately to university standards.

Style & Presentation – Some Dos
and Don’ts

1. ESSAY PREPARATIONS AND RESEARCH:

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 7


You need to relate your essay to the specific
topic provided in this Guide. You cannot create your own topic. It is essential
that you read the instructions for your assignment.
• You
are expected to have basic knowledge about how to do academic research (both
online and in the Library). If you would like help, or are unsure about how to
research academic material, please ask either your unit coordinator or tutor
for help. If you do require help, please ensure that you that approach your
teaching staff well before the assignment due date.


Wikipedia
is not an academic source!


Make
sure you follow the Harvard referencing style guide from the UWS Library
website.


Preparation is key to good writing. The more
time you spend mapping out your assignment, the more likely it is that you will
produce a coherent and convincing argument.

2.ESSAY STRUCTURE,
CONTENT AND PRESENTATION:


Your
essay should be 1.5 or double spaced.


Your
assignment should be sufficiently titled so as to indicate the question you
have selected.


Your reference list must be included at the
end of your essay. Failure to include a reference list can result in an
automatic failure and can constitute serious academic misconduct.

Avoid
overly long sentences and . Simple is better.

3.BEFORE SUBMISSION:

• You
need to read your essay prior to submission. If it doesn’t make sense to you,
it won’t make sense to your marker either.


RUN
A SPELLING AND GRAMMAR CHECK.


Make sure all your references are fully and
properly acknowledged (including page numbers for direct quotations).

For more guidance, please see the
Assignment Writing Guide in the Assessments tab on vUWS.
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Assessment 2
>>>

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 8

ASSESSMENT
TWO
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A2 Assessment

RESEARCH Essay (2,000 Words) Worth:
60%

A2 Due

BEFORE Monday 26 May, 2014, 5:00 PM

A2 Submission

Submission:

This
assignment is to be submitted and will be returned via the Turnitin link on
vUWS. There is no

hardcopy submission.

Late Penalty:

If the assignment is submitted
(without an approved extension) after the due date and time, it will

attract a late
penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at
which time

the penalty will
be 100% of what the assignment is worth. Assessments will not be accepted
after the

marked assessment task has been
returned to students who submitted the task on time. Also see

section on
Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached
Social Science

Student Resources document.

Is assessment
compulsory?

Yes, you must
complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as
explained in Section

5) regardless of the aggregate mark
you achieve across assessments.

A2 Description

Write an essay answering one of the
following questions:

1.
Citing
examples, discuss the relationship between neoliberal ideology and corporate
crime.

2. Discuss
recent public concern surrounding outlaw motorcycle gangs in relation to law
and order politics? Has a ‘law and order commonsense’ been produced in public
and media discourse? How and to what effect?

3. Discuss
how the process of privatisation can be seen as related to risk, fear and
insecurity using the example of the growth of the private security industry.

4.The
International Criminal Court receives criticism for being unable to fulfil its
mandate. Critically discuss the contradictions that its goal of “global
justice” raises in relation to issues of sovereignty.


Please
note that for this assignment you are required to cite at least 10 academic

references.
Note: Wikipedia, lecture notes and media articles are NOT academic references.
If you do use media articles, these will be considered in addition to your
required references.

Students are strongly encouraged to extend
their research to additional readings. Please visit the library website for
literacy resources.


Assessment
guidance will be provided in tutorials.
.gif”>

A2 Criteria
Marking Rubric, standards and
criteria:

Your work will be marked according to
the following criteria:


Your
ability to address the essay question;


The
clarity and sophistication of argument;


Evidence
of having read and understood relevant literature;


Evidence
of critical thinking and engagement with theory;


Ability
to write clearly and reference appropriately to university standards.

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 9

Style & Presentation – Some Dos and Don’ts

Same as
for your Assessment 1 – please see the section above.

Please
note:

Final marks and grades are subject to
confirmation by the School and College Assessment Committee which may scale,
modify or otherwise amend the marks and grades for the unit, as may be required
by University policies.
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School of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit
Outline or Learning Guide Page 10

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Section
3 SECTION THREE:
Teaching and Learning Activities
.gif”>.gif”>.gif”>.gif”>.gif”>.gif”>
For
your convenience the Learning and Teaching Schedule is on the second page of
the Learning Guide.
.gif”>
Section
4 SECTION
FOUR: Learning Resources
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For your convenience the following are
listed in Section 1 with other Unit Information:

• Textbook

• Readings

• Any additional
resources

• Referencing
requirements.
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Literacy
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Section
5 SECTION
FIVE: Expectations of You, and By You
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See SSAPguide for:

• Expectations of
students

• Expectations of UWS
staff

• Raising concerns

• Links to key
policies.
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Unit Number

102037

.jpg”>.jpg”>

102037

School
of Social Sciences and Psychology Unit Outline or
Learning Guide Page 11

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