Islamic Civilization

| January 27, 2016

Islamic Civilization

assess your understanding of how primary sources are used in historical research. This
review will emphasize how historians have used available sources to develop arguments about early
Islamic history.
Read the following passage and answer the questions below in about one paragraph each:
Hadith from Sahih Bukhari (al-Bukhari’s collection of “sound” hadith)
Vol. 8, Book 73, No. 51:
Narrated by Abu Musa al-Ash’ari:
The Prophet [Muhammad] said, “Every Muslim is required to give
alms (charity).
The people asked, “And what if one has nothing?’
He replied “He should work with his hands so that he may benefit
himself and give in charity.”
They said, “If he cannot work or does not work?”
He said, “Then he should help the oppressed, unhappy people by
word or action.”
They said, “If he does not do it?”
He said, “Then he should do what is good’
They said, “If he does not do that”’
He said, “Then he should refrain from doing evil, for that will be
considered for Him as a charity.”
Log on to the module for Week #3 in Blackboard, and submit answers for the questions
below in one short paragraph (4-6 sentences) each.
1. What are hadith? What is important to know about the form and function of this passage?
Why are hadith like the example above significant historically and spiritually? [1 pt]
2. Is this source more productively read as a narrative source or a normative source for the history
of early Islam? Why? Give at least one specific example of something we can argue about
early Islam using a source like this. [2 pts]
3. In The Lives of Muhammad, what is Kecia Ali’s main argument about biographical research on
the prophet Muhammad? Based on your reading of this book, give three examples of how or
why historians using the same primary sources (hadith, the biography of Muhammad, etc.)
might use or interpret the material in different ways. [2 pts]
Quiz #1 will assess your understanding of how primary sources are used in historical research. This review will emphasize how historians have used available sources to develop arguments about early Islamic history.
Read the following passage and answer the questions below in about one paragraph each:
Hadith from Sahih Bukhari (al-Bukhari’s collection of “sound” hadith)
Vol. 8, Book 73, No. 51:
Narrated by Abu Musa al-Ash’ari:
The Prophet [Muhammad] said, “Every Muslim is required to give alms (charity).
The people asked, “And what if one has nothing?’
He replied “He should work with his hands so that he may benefit
himself and give in charity.”
They said, “If he cannot work or does not work?”
He said, “Then he should help the oppressed, unhappy people by
word or action.”
They said, “If he does not do it?”
He said, “Then he should do what is good’
They said, “If he does not do that”’
He said, “Then he should refrain from doing evil, for that will be
considered for Him as a charity.”
Log on to the module for Week #3 in Blackboard, and submit answers for the questions below in one short paragraph (4-6 sentences) each.
1. What are hadith? What is important to know about the form and function of this passage? Why are hadith like the example above significant historically and spiritually? [1 pt]
2. Isthissourcemoreproductivelyreadasanarrativesourceoranormativesourceforthehistory of early Islam? Why? Give at least one specific example of something we can argue about early Islam using a source like this. [2 pts]
3. In The Lives of Muhammad, what is Kecia Ali’s main argument about biographical research on the prophet Muhammad? Based on your reading of this book, give three examples of how or why historians using the same primary sources (hadith, the biography of Muhammad, etc.) might use or interpret the material in different ways. [2 pts]

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