devry psyc110 ch 12 post lab test

| September 29, 2018

Ch 12

1)
Cindy tastes peas for the first time and realizes she does
not like them. Cindy formed her attitude about peas through the process of:

vicarious conditioning.

persuasion.

direct contact.

direct instruction.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression, Formation, and Attribution, p. 467

2)
The fact that Kitty Genovese did not receive help was most
likely due to _____.

the indifference and apathy of witnesses

the fact that it was dark outside

the fear of witnesses for their own lives

the perceived presence of multiple witnesses

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Aggression and Prosocial Behavior, pp. 491-492

3)
Karen intentionally tries to hurt Lisa by spreading rumors
about her. Karen is engaging in:

aggression.

discrimination.

prejudice.

reciprocity.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Aggression and Prosocial Behavior, p. 487

4)
When parents tell their children that smoking cigarettes is
dangerous and unhealthy, and the children develop negative attitudes toward
smoking, this is an example of:

observational learning.

direct contact.

interaction with others.

direct instruction.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression Formation, and Attribution, p. 467

5)
If your roommate asks you for a ride to campus and you
agree, and then the next day asks if he can borrow your car, this is an example
of the:

lowball technique.

foot-in-the-door technique.

door-in-the-face technique.

that’s-not-all technique.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Influence: Conformity, Group Behavior, Compliance, and Obedience, p. 459

6)
Julie is a psychologist involved in figuring out how to get
people to purchase a certain brand of computer. Julie is involved in:

conformity psychology.

consumer psychology.

computer psychology.

coercion psychology.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Influence: Conformity, Group Behavior, Compliance, and Obedience, p. 458

7)
Sheri’s coworker, Stephanie, is very afraid of spiders and
screams every time she sees one in the warehouse. After a few weeks of working
closely with Stephanie in the warehouse, Sheri is afraid of spiders, too. This
is an example of:

direct contact.

vicarious conditioning.

direct instruction.

persuasion.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression Formation, and Attribution, p. 467

8)
Justin walks into the morning meeting 15 minutes late. His
boss, Marco, assumes that traffic was bad this morning. Marco is using an
example of:

dispositional cause.

situational cause.

inherent attribution.

the fundamental attribution error.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression Formation, and Attribution, p. 473

9)
The fundamental attribution error is less likely:

in the United States.

in collectivist cultures.

among older adults.

among women.

Score: 0
Feedback: Incorrect.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression Formation, and Attribution, pp. 474-475

10)
People can reduce cognitive dissonance by:

consulting with a therapist.

changing their peers in order to find people with similar
beliefs.

forming new cognitions to justify their behavior.

ignoring it until it eventually goes away.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression Formation, and Attribution, p. 469

11)
A person tries to change the belief, opinion, or course of
action of another person through:

persuasion.

direct contact.

observational learning.

aggression.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression, Formation, and Attribution, p. 467

12)
According to the ________, people either expand on what they
hear or they pay attention to the surface characteristics of persuasive
messages.

ABC model of attitudes

theory of social facilitation

elaboration likelihood model

that’s-not-all technique

Score: 0
Feedback: Incorrect.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression Formation, and Attribution, p. 468

13)
Which of the following statements best describes attitudes?

Attitudes are learned through experiences as we live and
work with others.

Attitudes are something people have when they are born.

Attitudes consist only of thoughts.

Attitudes consist only of feelings.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Cognition: Attitudes, Impression, Formation, and Attribution, p. 465

14)
In the Latane and Darley smoke-filled room study,
participants were most likely to report the smoke when:

the smoke became overwhelming.

there were four or more participants.

they were the only ones in the room.

the smoke became too thick to see through.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Aggression and Prosocial Behavior, p. 492

15)
The sadistic behavior of the “guards” in Philip
Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Study:

has only been seen in experiments.

was all an act.

highlighted the influence that a social role can have on
ordinary people.

can be explained primarily by the guards’ personality
abnormalities.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Aggression and Prosocial Behavior, p. 488

16)
Scapegoats are:

often the groups who have been around the longest.

typically members of the in-group.

the member of the group with the most power.

typically members of the out-group.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Interaction: Prejudice and Aggression, p. 477

17)
In order to teach her second grade students about ______,
teacher Jane Elliot created in-groups and out-groups based on the superficial
characteristic of eye color.

the “jigsaw classroom”

discrimination

scapegoats

equal status contact

Score: 0
Feedback: Incorrect.
Classic Studies in Psychology: Brown Eyes, Blue Eyes, p. 478

18)
The formation of in-groups and out-groups:

begins in childhood.

often happens in college.

is inborn.

begins in adolescence.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Interaction: Prejudice and Aggression, p. 477

19)
The “jigsaw classroom”:

is a technique that gives each individual only part of the
information needed to solve a problem, so they must work with others to find
the solution.

is the tendency for a student’s expectations to affect his
or her behavior in such a way as to make these expectations more likely to
occur.

occurs when there is sharp tension between in-groups and
out-groups in a classroom.

was the strategy used by Jane Elliot in her second grade
classroom.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Interaction: Prejudice and Aggression, p. 480

20)
Strategies for overcoming prejudice include:

education and competition.

minimizing intergroup contact.

intergroup and equal status contact.

having groups participate against each other in competitive
situations.

Score: 0
Feedback: Incorrect.
Social Interaction: Prejudice and Aggression, pp. 479–480

21)
In one study, college students liked another student simply
because they were told that the other student liked them. This is an example of
which rule of attraction?

similarity

physical attractiveness

reciprocity

proximity

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Liking and Loving: Interpersonal Attraction, p. 483

22)
Sternberg’s Triangular Theory of Love says that companionate
love consists of:

intimacy and commitment.

romance only.

intimacy and passion.

passion only.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Liking and Loving: Interpersonal Attraction, p. 485

23)
In Sternberg’s theory, _______ encompasses the physical
aspects of love.

intimacy

passion

sex

commitment

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Liking and Loving: Interpersonal Attraction, p. 484

24)
The war in Iraq, the design of the ship Titanic, and the
Challenger disaster are all given in the textbook as examples of:

persuasion.

groupthink.

obedience.

observational learning.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Influence: Conformity, Group Behavior, Compliance, and Obedience, p. 456

25)
A person demanding _______ has power or authority to command
a behavioral change, rather than just ask for a change.

compliance

a favor

conformity

obedience

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Influence: Conformity, Group Behavior, Compliance, and Obedience, p. 458

26)
In the Milgram study and several similar studies, _____
percent of the participants went all the way up to the 450-volt shock level.

10

26

86

65

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Influence: Conformity, Group Behavior, Compliance, and Obedience, p. 462

27)
In Solomon Asch’s study, confederates were instructed to:

give the incorrect answer to the line-matching task.

challenge the experimenter.

give the correct answer to the line-matching task.

openly refuse to participate in the experiment.

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Influence: Conformity, Group Behavior, Compliance, and Obedience, p. 455

28)
In Milgram’s study, as the teachers became reluctant to
continue, the experimenter:

argued with the teachers over the inhumane nature of the
shocks.

left it up to the teachers whether or not to continue.

allowed them to quit.

told them that they had to continue.

Score: 0
Feedback: Incorrect.
Social Influence: Conformity, Group Behavior, Compliance, and Obedience, p. 462

29)
Research on conformity suggests that if a _____ response is
required, ______ show more conformity than ______.

private; men; women

public; men; women

private; women; men

public; women; men

Score: 1
Feedback: Correct.
Social Influence: Conformity, Group Behavior, Compliance, and Obedience, pp.
455-456

30)
As we interact with others on a daily basis, our behavior,
feelings, and thoughts are often guided by:

social influence.

consummate love.

the norm of reciprocity.

bystander apathy.

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