devry ltre421 Week 6 & 7 Course Project latest 2017

| August 31, 2017

Question
Week 6 Course Project First Draft

Your Title Goes Here

Start with the attention-grabbing statement. Name the literary works and the authors you will discuss right away. Identify the topic. This idea lets your readers know what your paper is about in general terms. Identify the major theme(s) that your paper will explore. Express the purpose. This idea allows readers to understand why you are talking about these literary works in this way. Clarify the critical approach(s) that you will take in the paper. End with your thesis statement. Be clear and concise about your idea and why it will succeed in enlightening a potential reader on the literary works you discuss.

The topic sentence for section I belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

The topic sentence for section II belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. See the lecture for Week 6 regarding information on what belongs in this section. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

Continue to provide topics and support until you have completed every part of your argument and deployed your evidence.

The final section of the paper is the conclusion. This is not the area just to repeat earlier information. It should also not simply summarize the literature. The conclusion should summarize the paper’s main arguments and demonstrate that the thesis has been proved.

As the last page of this document, include your references. Format each entry using alphabetical order of each author’s last name, or the first word of the title (excluding a, an, and the) if no author exists. Be sure to have each entry start flush left; then the second and each subsequent line must be hanging indented. You also need to see the example below.

Before you turn in the paper, go to review above and click on spelling and grammar. Not every error will be flagged, and some that are flagged as errors are actually correct. So this spell checker is not foolproof. Also, check your page count, which includes only the text pages, not the title page or references page. If you have fewer than five full pages of text, it’s a red flag that not enough information exists. If you go above the suggested page count, that’s OK as long as you’re concise, not repeating yourself, and including only relevant information. Then saveas your last name.first.research.draft.1.doc. Put it in the Dropbox as an attachment so that if done correctly, a paper icon appears next to the assignment. Be sure when it’s graded to read the comments so that you can improve for your next draft.

References

Put your sources cited in-text above here in alphabetical order, starting with the first line flush left and hanging indent of the second and each subsequent line. Each in-text citation should have a corresponding reference entry here. Below are examples of references from the course anthology textbook. The first is an example of a reference for a chapter in the literature text. The second is an example of a literature reference. The second is an example of a chapter reference.

Roberts, E. V., & Zweig, R. (2015). Chapter 25: Critical approaches important in

the study of literature. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An

Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., pp. 1566-1588). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Robinson, E. A. (2015). Richard Cory. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.),

Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., p.

590). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. (Original work published 1897)

Week 7 Course Project Final Paper

Start with the attention-grabbing statement. Name the literary works and the authors you will discuss right away. Identify the topic.This idea lets your readers know what your paper is about in general terms. Identify the major theme(s) that your paper will explore. Express the purpose.This idea allows readers to understand why you are talking about these literary works in this way. Clarify the critical approach(s) that you will take in the paper. End with your thesis statement. Be clear and concise about your idea and why it will succeed in enlightening a potential reader on the literary works you discuss.

The topic sentence for section I belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

The topic sentence for section II belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. See the lecture for Week 6 regarding information that belongs in this section. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

Continue to provide topics and support until you have completed every part of your argument and deployed your evidence.

The final section of the paper is the conclusion. This is not the area just to repeat earlier information. It should also not simply summarize the literature. The conclusion should summarize the paper’s main arguments and demonstrate that the thesis has been proved.

As the last page of this document, include your references. Format each entry using alphabetical order of each author’s last name, or the first word of the title (excluding a, an, and the) if no author exists. Be sure to have each entry start flush left; then the second and each subsequent line must be hanging indented. You also need to see the example below.

Before you turn in the paper, go to review above and click on spelling and grammar. Not every error will be flagged, and some that are flagged as errors are actually correct. So this spell checker is not foolproof. Also, check your page count, which includes only the text pages, not the title page or references page. If you have fewer than five full pages of text, it’s a red flag that not enough information exists. If you go above the suggested page count, that’s OK as long as you’re concise, not repeating yourself, and including only relevant information. Then saveas . . your last name.first.research.draft.1.doc. Put it in the Dropbox as an attachment so that if done correctly, a paper icon appears next to the assignment. Be sure when it’s graded to read the comments so that you can understand the grade your paper received.

References

Put your sources cited in-text above here in alphabetical order, starting with the first line flush left and hanging indent of the second and each subsequent line. Each in-text citation should have a corresponding reference entry here. Below are examples of references from the course anthology textbook. The first is an example of a reference for a chapter in the literature text. The second is an example of a literature reference. The second is an example of a chapter reference.

Roberts, E. V., & Zweig, R. (2015). Chapter 25: Critical approaches important in

the study of literature. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An

Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., pp. 1566-1588). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Robinson, E. A. (2015). Richard Cory. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.),

Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., p.

590). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. (Original work published 1897)

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