devry ltre421 full course latest 2017

| August 31, 2017

uestion
Week 1 discussion

DQ1 NARRATIVE POINT OF VIEW

Read the course lecture section for Week 1 on point of view. Three of the stories this week are told in first-person point of view, whereas The Story of an Hour is told in third-person point of view. Using examples from The Story of an Hour and at least one of the other stories, explain the differences between the points of view. In particular, discuss how the different points of view orient the audience toward the characters and plots of the stories. How does the narrative point of view affect the realism of the stories? Who is the narrator’s audience? What is the narrator trying to convince the audience to think or feel about the subject of the story?

DQ2 SETTING

Read the course lecture section for Week 1 on setting. Choose two stories from this week’s reading, and explain the effect of setting on the characters and plots. Identify the visual descriptions used in the stories, and discuss how these descriptions help the reader picture the environment of the stories. Discuss the relationships of the characters to the settings; for example, how these characters fit this setting. What conclusions do you think the authors expect you to draw as a result of the locations, times, and cultures of the stories?

Week 2 discussion

DQ1 SOUND DEVICES IN POETRY

Locate and discuss specific sound devices in one of the poems assigned for this week’s reading. What effects do sound devices, such as assonance, consonance, alliteration, and onomatopoeia, have on you, the reader, or listener?

DQ2 SYMBOLISM AND IMAGERY IN POETRY

From the poems we have read for this week, choose one or more with a symbol or image that you find striking and memorable. Identify what you have chosen as a symbol or an image. Explain how the symbol or image affects you as a reader.

Week 3 discussion

DQ1 FAMILIES IN THE PLAY

As a character, Hamlet is almost overwhelming because of his strange behavior, especially toward women, the fake or possibly real madness, and his melancholy. Many spectators barely notice the other characters. Let’s have a closer look at Polonius and his family. What do they represent in the play from a social point of view? Why do their plans go so horribly wrong, when they conform to all the rules and want to help? How does their social status and conformism become evident in the way they speak, behave, or react? Use specific examples and dialogue from the play to support your answers.

DQ2 WOMEN IN THE PLAY

Let’s consider Ophelia and Gertrude as the only female characters in this play. What is Shakespeare telling his audience about the status of women through these characters? What clues do we get about their social positions as women? Use specific dialogue and examples from the play to demonstrate your arguments.

Week 4 discussion

DQ1 CHOOSING A CRITICAL APPROACH

Review the You Decide activity for this week. After you have reviewed the activity, use the descriptions of the critical approaches from the activity and the assigned textbook readings and write a thesis for Sarah Smart’s paper based on one of the critical approaches discussed in the You Decide activity. Afterward, select and present evidence from Sylvia Plath’s poem Daddy (pages 870–872) that you think would support the thesis you wrote. The evidence should be quotations from the poem and references to specific images, symbols, and metaphors from the poem. Be sure to explain how the evidence you chose supports your thesis.

DQ2 CHILDHOOD IN LITERATURE

Discuss how The Lesson, Where Children Live, and Sestina portray childhood. What does childhood seem to mean in each work? How does each portray the experience of being a child? Do you think these portrayals of childhood are realistic? Why or why not? Be sure to quote from each work, and discuss specific images, symbols, or metaphors as you clarify your answers.

Week 5 discussion

DQ1 MARRIED LIFE IN LITERATURE

Three selections from this week’s reading give us glimpses into married life: To My Dear and Loving Husband by Anne Bradstreet (pages 890–891), Talking in Bed by Philip Larkin (page 918), and Post-its (Notes on a Marriage) by Paul Dooley & Winnie Holzman (pages 1,331–1,334). Discuss the differences in their portrayals of married life. What kinds of joys are portrayed in these selections? What kinds of problems do they portray?

DQ2 LOVE IN LITERATURE

Consider the following literary works from this week’s reading: The Horse Dealer’s Daughter by D.H. Lawrence (pages 392–402), How Do I Love Thee? by Elizabeth Barrett Browning (page 892), She Walks in Beauty by George Gordon, Lord Byron (pages 893–894), and Oranges by Gary Soto (pages 943–944). In literary works, love is often portrayed either as ideal and nearly supernatural, or as destructive. Which of the listed works portray love as ideal? Which portray it as destructive? What do the works suggest about the power of love to shape people’s lives?

Week 6 discussion

DQ1 USING CRITICAL APPROACHES

Sarah from the Week 6 You Decide has written two potential thesis statements to work from.

For thesis 1: In the story Battle Royal, Ralph Ellison shows that a society in which one group of powerful men can legally humiliate another group of men without punishment makes social equality impossible.

For thesis 2: The narrator of Ralph Ellison’s Battle Royal learns that in the segregated South of the 1940s, African-Americans were in a constant battle against racist oppression, but had no clear strategy for winning the battle.

In this week’s discussion, choose one of the thesis sentences and state which critical perspective better fits that thesis, then explain what kind of research evidence Sarah should look for to support her thesis and provide details from the story Battle Royal that best support that thesis.

DQ2 RACE AND ETHNICITY IN LITERATURE

In David Henry Hwang’s Trying to Find Chinatown, Ronnie says to Benjamin “There’re worlds out there, worlds you haven’t even begun to understand.” What does he mean by this? Using Trying to Find Chinatown and one other literary reading from this week except Battle Royal, explain how Ronnie’s statement is a theme in literature about race and ethnic relations.

Week 7 discussion

DQ1 DEATH IN WAR

Both Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried (pages 101–111) and Randall Jarrell’s Death of the Ball Turret Gunner (page 550) describe a death as a result of war. Yet each is remarkably different in the tone used to describe that death. What are the differences in tone between these two works? How do these differences affect what readers are to learn about the significance of death in war?

DQ2 GRIEF IN LITERATURE

Both Ben Jonson’s On My First Daughter (pages 550–551) and Seamus Heaney’s Mid-Term Break (page 697) are about reconciling oneself to the death of a child. How does each speaker reconcile himself to this death? Or does he reconcile? Does either speaker draw any significance from this death? Compare the attitudes expressed in these two poems with the attitudes about the inevitable death of oneself as portrayed in Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find (pages 484–493) and Emily Dickinson’s Because I Could Not Stop for Death (pages 545–546). How is the grandmother’s behavior when confronted by her own death in the O’Connor story different from the speaker’s attitude about her own death in the Dickinson poem? Do any of these four works agree about the significance of death to the living?

Week 8 discussion

Class, looking back over the Course Objectives for this course, what are you looking forward to learning more about throughout your education and career?

Week 1 Essay Paper

Explication of Fiction

Having completed the lecture and the readings for this week, select a short story that resonates with you and has themes that you feel you can discuss. Compose an essay that includes the following information, but not necessarily in this order.

Give a brief (one paragraph) summary of your selected story.

Is the story’s protagonist a hero or an antihero?

How does the protagonist relate to society?

What themes or ideas is this story about?

What aspects of the story—its characters, narrator, dialogue, and setting—demonstrate these themes?

What is the intended audience of your selection?

What do you think the author wants the audience to understand about the themes you have identified?

Try to use only the course lecture, your textbook, and your brain. You do not need to conduct research, but you should where research is needed.

The format for this assignment is an essay. The document you submit should not be just a set of answers to questions. It should have an introduction, body, and conclusion. It should develop a line of reasoning based on a thesis about the story stated at the end of the introduction.

The essay should be one to three pages in APA style (citing your textbook material appropriately, according to the APA format).

Week 2 Essay Paper

Explication of Poetry

In well-stated paragraphs totaling two to three pages write about one of the paired sets of poems listed below. Each pair contains one of the assigned poems from this week’s reading and an additional poem from the textbook.

Robert Frost Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening (page 548) and Virgina Scott Snow (pages 764–765)

Louis Simpson American Poetry (page 555) and Mark Strand Eating Poetry (pages 593–594)

William Wordsworth Daffodils (I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud) (page 595) and Amy Lowell Patterns (pages 921–923)

William Butler Yeats When You Are Old (page 713) and Dorothy Parker Afternoon (pages 928–929)

Langston Hughes Theme for English B (pages 861–862) and Sherman Alexie On the Amtrak from Boston to New York City (pages 883–884)

Refer to our lectures and the assigned sections from the textbook Poetry in the English Language and How to Read a Poem, then consider the following questions.

What is the subject of each poem?

What relationship to historical context does each poem bear?

Where does each poem fit in the tradition of poetry?

What are the primary similes, metaphors, or symbols used in creating each poem’s meaning?

What are the similarities between the subjects of each poem?

How does each poem differ in its consideration of the subject?

What linguistic and rhetorical devices is the poet using, and what are their effects?

This assignment asks you to understand the lecture material fully. You do not have to answer the questions in the order given here, but you do need to answer all the questions in your paper. The essay should conform to essay standards, and should not be a set of unconnected answers to the questions. The essay should have an introduction, thesis, body, and conclusion. Use APA citations and references. Make sure that the essay follows APA formatting with Times New Roman 12-point font, double spacing, a title page, and headers. There is no requirement to conduct research for this essay. However, if you do conduct research outside of your text and the essays mentioned above, all sources used must be scrupulously cited in APA format.

Week 4 Course Project

The purpose of a proposal is to get your ideas started, and to do so in a manner that can lead to an effective research paper. Your research proposal will be presented as a sentence outline. As the name suggests, the sentence outline presents complete thoughts in complete sentences as opposed to phrases. In each section of the proposal, choose ideas with the goal of planning your literature project. Use a complete sentence to provide the response to each of the questions below. You can use first person. Use APA documentation for the final section of the proposal to document any sources referenced in your proposal. Remember to put at least two items at any given level of the outline, as shown in this template and the sample proposal.

I. Introduction

A. Topic

1) What is your research question? (Reprint the topic you have chosen from the list of topics in the Course Project page.)

2) What is your working thesis? (It answers your research question and defines the direction of your argument.)

3) What is your angle on the topic? (Your angle is the critical approachyou will use to discuss the literary works.)

B. Literary Works

1) Name the first literary work your paper will discuss. Justify for your reader why this work is suitable for the topic.

2) Name the second literary work your paper will discuss. Justify for your reader why this work is suitable for the topic.

3) [optional] Name any additional literary work your paper will discuss. Justify for your reader why this work is suitable for the topic.

C. Theme

1) What is the primary literary theme in these works? (These are the themes named in the Course Project instructions.)

2) Whatareany secondary or related themes in these works? (Identify other ideas connected with the primary literary theme.)

3) What are some potential opinions and values your paper’s audience may have concerning these themes? (Determine if the audience is likely to take a side or if they may be skeptical or even neutral regarding the themes.)

II. Evidence

A. What research have you gathered so far? (What have you found that supports your purpose and angle?)

B. What research do you need to gather? (What other kinds of information will you need as support? Where will you look to find these sources?)

III. Conclusion (What would you like the readers of your project to understand about the literature you discuss?)

IV. [optional] References if you cite any sources in this proposal (must be correctly formatted according tothe APA Publication Manual).

Week 5 Course Project Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography for [Your Title Here]

To start your annotated bibliography, write an introductory paragraph to gain the attention of your reader and set the context for your research. Start by naming the works of literature you will be discussing and their authors. Provide a brief description of the themes you will be discussing in your paper. You may also want to provide a brief statement about the critical perspective you will be using. Provide your working thesis statement that answers your research question and provides the direction of your argument. The annotated bibliography will include five annotated references and is to include a summary paragraph that summarizes the source and the author’s main points and relevance to your research and the credibility, reliability, and timeliness of the source material.

Put your first alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style.Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibilityand reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Put your second alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style. Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibility and reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Put your third alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style. Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibility and reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Put your fourth alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style. Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibility and reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Put your fifth alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style. Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibility and reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Before you turn in the assignment, select the review tab from the MS Word toolbar above and click on spelling & grammar. Check each flagged error. Then rename this document using File>Save As and save the file with your last name.first.Anno Bib.doc. Be sure when it’s graded to read the comments so that you can incorporate improvements into your next assignment.

Week 6 Course Project First Draft

Your Title Goes Here

Start with the attention-grabbing statement. Name the literary works and the authors you will discuss right away. Identify the topic. This idea lets your readers know what your paper is about in general terms. Identify the major theme(s) that your paper will explore. Express the purpose. This idea allows readers to understand why you are talking about these literary works in this way. Clarify the critical approach(s) that you will take in the paper. End with your thesis statement. Be clear and concise about your idea and why it will succeed in enlightening a potential reader on the literary works you discuss.

The topic sentence for section I belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

The topic sentence for section II belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. See the lecture for Week 6 regarding information on what belongs in this section. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

Continue to provide topics and support until you have completed every part of your argument and deployed your evidence.

The final section of the paper is the conclusion. This is not the area just to repeat earlier information. It should also not simply summarize the literature. The conclusion should summarize the paper’s main arguments and demonstrate that the thesis has been proved.

As the last page of this document, include your references. Format each entry using alphabetical order of each author’s last name, or the first word of the title (excluding a, an, and the) if no author exists. Be sure to have each entry start flush left; then the second and each subsequent line must be hanging indented. You also need to see the example below.

Before you turn in the paper, go to review above and click on spelling and grammar. Not every error will be flagged, and some that are flagged as errors are actually correct. So this spell checker is not foolproof. Also, check your page count, which includes only the text pages, not the title page or references page. If you have fewer than five full pages of text, it’s a red flag that not enough information exists. If you go above the suggested page count, that’s OK as long as you’re concise, not repeating yourself, and including only relevant information. Then saveas your last name.first.research.draft.1.doc. Put it in the Dropbox as an attachment so that if done correctly, a paper icon appears next to the assignment. Be sure when it’s graded to read the comments so that you can improve for your next draft.

References

Put your sources cited in-text above here in alphabetical order, starting with the first line flush left and hanging indent of the second and each subsequent line. Each in-text citation should have a corresponding reference entry here. Below are examples of references from the course anthology textbook. The first is an example of a reference for a chapter in the literature text. The second is an example of a literature reference. The second is an example of a chapter reference.

Roberts, E. V., & Zweig, R. (2015). Chapter 25: Critical approaches important in

the study of literature. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An

Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., pp. 1566-1588). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Robinson, E. A. (2015). Richard Cory. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.),

Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., p.

590). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. (Original work published 1897)

Week 7 Course Project Final Paper

Start with the attention-grabbing statement. Name the literary works and the authors you will discuss right away. Identify the topic.This idea lets your readers know what your paper is about in general terms. Identify the major theme(s) that your paper will explore. Express the purpose.This idea allows readers to understand why you are talking about these literary works in this way. Clarify the critical approach(s) that you will take in the paper. End with your thesis statement. Be clear and concise about your idea and why it will succeed in enlightening a potential reader on the literary works you discuss.

The topic sentence for section I belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

The topic sentence for section II belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. See the lecture for Week 6 regarding information that belongs in this section. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

Continue to provide topics and support until you have completed every part of your argument and deployed your evidence.

The final section of the paper is the conclusion. This is not the area just to repeat earlier information. It should also not simply summarize the literature. The conclusion should summarize the paper’s main arguments and demonstrate that the thesis has been proved.

As the last page of this document, include your references. Format each entry using alphabetical order of each author’s last name, or the first word of the title (excluding a, an, and the) if no author exists. Be sure to have each entry start flush left; then the second and each subsequent line must be hanging indented. You also need to see the example below.

Before you turn in the paper, go to review above and click on spelling and grammar. Not every error will be flagged, and some that are flagged as errors are actually correct. So this spell checker is not foolproof. Also, check your page count, which includes only the text pages, not the title page or references page. If you have fewer than five full pages of text, it’s a red flag that not enough information exists. If you go above the suggested page count, that’s OK as long as you’re concise, not repeating yourself, and including only relevant information. Then saveas . . your last name.first.research.draft.1.doc. Put it in the Dropbox as an attachment so that if done correctly, a paper icon appears next to the assignment. Be sure when it’s graded to read the comments so that you can understand the grade your paper received.

References

Put your sources cited in-text above here in alphabetical order, starting with the first line flush left and hanging indent of the second and each subsequent line. Each in-text citation should have a corresponding reference entry here. Below are examples of references from the course anthology textbook. The first is an example of a reference for a chapter in the literature text. The second is an example of a literature reference. The second is an example of a chapter reference.

Roberts, E. V., & Zweig, R. (2015). Chapter 25: Critical approaches important in

the study of literature. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An

Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., pp. 1566-1588). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Robinson, E. A. (2015). Richard Cory. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.),

Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., p.

590). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. (Original work published 1897)

Week 8 final exam

Question 1 5 pts

(TCO 3) The character against whom the protagonist’s struggle is directed is called what?

Conflict

Antagonist

Structure

Organic unity

Question 2 5 pts

(TCO 3) Free verse is defined as

poetry with no regular meter or rhyme scheme.

poetry in heightened language.

poetry with a regular meter and rhyme scheme.

poetry written for specific occasions.

Question 3 5 pts

(TCO 1) Which of the following is not a major genre of literature?

Technical and scientific articles

Drama

Poetry

Prose fiction

Question 4 5 pts

(TCO 2) Situations in a play in which characters have only partial, misguided, or incorrect understanding of what is happening are called

contextual symbols.

themes.

complications.

dramatic ironies.

Question 5 5 pts

(TCO 1) When one thing is described with the properties of another thing that it is not, this is a

theme.

metaphor.

symbol.

figure of speech.

Question 6 5 pts

(TCOs 3 and 5) In Freytag’s Pyramid of dramatic structure, exposition

refers to

the part of a drama that introduces a play’s background, characters, and situations.

the point of view that the play expresses.

the end of the play’s central conflict.

the circumstances that force a play’s protagonist to recognize what needs to be done to resolve the conflict.

Question 7 5 pts

(TCO 5) Which of the following is not a feature of blank verse as used in Hamlet?

Iambic, using two syllables vocalized in the pattern unstressed, stressed

Ends up to be 10 syllable lines

Rhymed verse

Each unstressed-stressed syllabic pair makes a foot pentameter (5 feet to a line)

Question 8 5 pts

(TCO 6) A literary critic using the structuralist

critical approach would look for which of the following features of a literary work?

The ways that content and form in a literary work provide insights for evaluating the quality of the work

The potential message or lesson the work has about leading a better life

The relationships and connections among elements that otherwise appear separate and unique

The historical circumstances in which the literary work was created

Question 9 5 pts

(TCO 6) The critical approach that focuses on the patterns in a story that are similar throughout various cultures and historical times would be

structuralist.

psychological and psychoanalytic.

archetypal and symbolic and mythic.

feminist criticism and gender studies and queer theory.

Question 10 5 pts

(TCO 6) The focus on the social classes of characters in a literary work is an example of

psychological and psychoanalytic critical approach.

topical and historical critical approach.

economic determinist and Marxist critical approach.

moral and intellectual critical approach.

Question 11 50 pts

(TCO 4) What were the characteristics of Renaissance theater? How does Hamlet reveal that it was written specifically for Renaissance theater? Use specific examples from the play to show how the play would be performed.

Question 12 50 pts

(TCO 7) Compare the families in Sandra Cisneros’ Mericans and August Wilson’s Fences. Describe the concept of family that each work presents. What good and bad effects are produced within the families? What are the internal struggles of the families? Are these struggles resolved?

Question 13 50 pts

(TCO 8) Modern literature will often indirectly lead a reader to seeing the subject or main idea of the literary work. Consider Seamus Heaney’s Mid-Term Break and Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find and how the authors delay the punch until the very end. Discuss the clues the authors give early in the works that lead to the conclusions or foreshadow the endings. What are the advantages of this delaying tactic in literature?

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