devry ltre421 all week discussion latest 2017

| August 31, 2017

uestion
Week 1 discussion

DQ1 NARRATIVE POINT OF VIEW

Read the course lecture section for Week 1 on point of view. Three of the stories this week are told in first-person point of view, whereas The Story of an Hour is told in third-person point of view. Using examples from The Story of an Hour and at least one of the other stories, explain the differences between the points of view. In particular, discuss how the different points of view orient the audience toward the characters and plots of the stories. How does the narrative point of view affect the realism of the stories? Who is the narrator’s audience? What is the narrator trying to convince the audience to think or feel about the subject of the story?

DQ2 SETTING

Read the course lecture section for Week 1 on setting. Choose two stories from this week’s reading, and explain the effect of setting on the characters and plots. Identify the visual descriptions used in the stories, and discuss how these descriptions help the reader picture the environment of the stories. Discuss the relationships of the characters to the settings; for example, how these characters fit this setting. What conclusions do you think the authors expect you to draw as a result of the locations, times, and cultures of the stories?

Week 2 discussion

DQ1 SOUND DEVICES IN POETRY

Locate and discuss specific sound devices in one of the poems assigned for this week’s reading. What effects do sound devices, such as assonance, consonance, alliteration, and onomatopoeia, have on you, the reader, or listener?

DQ2 SYMBOLISM AND IMAGERY IN POETRY

From the poems we have read for this week, choose one or more with a symbol or image that you find striking and memorable. Identify what you have chosen as a symbol or an image. Explain how the symbol or image affects you as a reader.

Week 3 discussion

DQ1 FAMILIES IN THE PLAY

As a character, Hamlet is almost overwhelming because of his strange behavior, especially toward women, the fake or possibly real madness, and his melancholy. Many spectators barely notice the other characters. Let’s have a closer look at Polonius and his family. What do they represent in the play from a social point of view? Why do their plans go so horribly wrong, when they conform to all the rules and want to help? How does their social status and conformism become evident in the way they speak, behave, or react? Use specific examples and dialogue from the play to support your answers.

DQ2 WOMEN IN THE PLAY

Let’s consider Ophelia and Gertrude as the only female characters in this play. What is Shakespeare telling his audience about the status of women through these characters? What clues do we get about their social positions as women? Use specific dialogue and examples from the play to demonstrate your arguments.

Week 4 discussion

DQ1 CHOOSING A CRITICAL APPROACH

Review the You Decide activity for this week. After you have reviewed the activity, use the descriptions of the critical approaches from the activity and the assigned textbook readings and write a thesis for Sarah Smart’s paper based on one of the critical approaches discussed in the You Decide activity. Afterward, select and present evidence from Sylvia Plath’s poem Daddy (pages 870–872) that you think would support the thesis you wrote. The evidence should be quotations from the poem and references to specific images, symbols, and metaphors from the poem. Be sure to explain how the evidence you chose supports your thesis.

DQ2 CHILDHOOD IN LITERATURE

Discuss how The Lesson, Where Children Live, and Sestina portray childhood. What does childhood seem to mean in each work? How does each portray the experience of being a child? Do you think these portrayals of childhood are realistic? Why or why not? Be sure to quote from each work, and discuss specific images, symbols, or metaphors as you clarify your answers.

Week 5 discussion

DQ1 MARRIED LIFE IN LITERATURE

Three selections from this week’s reading give us glimpses into married life: To My Dear and Loving Husband by Anne Bradstreet (pages 890–891), Talking in Bed by Philip Larkin (page 918), and Post-its (Notes on a Marriage) by Paul Dooley & Winnie Holzman (pages 1,331–1,334). Discuss the differences in their portrayals of married life. What kinds of joys are portrayed in these selections? What kinds of problems do they portray?

DQ2 LOVE IN LITERATURE

Consider the following literary works from this week’s reading: The Horse Dealer’s Daughter by D.H. Lawrence (pages 392–402), How Do I Love Thee? by Elizabeth Barrett Browning (page 892), She Walks in Beauty by George Gordon, Lord Byron (pages 893–894), and Oranges by Gary Soto (pages 943–944). In literary works, love is often portrayed either as ideal and nearly supernatural, or as destructive. Which of the listed works portray love as ideal? Which portray it as destructive? What do the works suggest about the power of love to shape people’s lives?

Week 6 discussion

DQ1 USING CRITICAL APPROACHES

Sarah from the Week 6 You Decide has written two potential thesis statements to work from.

For thesis 1: In the story Battle Royal, Ralph Ellison shows that a society in which one group of powerful men can legally humiliate another group of men without punishment makes social equality impossible.

For thesis 2: The narrator of Ralph Ellison’s Battle Royal learns that in the segregated South of the 1940s, African-Americans were in a constant battle against racist oppression, but had no clear strategy for winning the battle.

In this week’s discussion, choose one of the thesis sentences and state which critical perspective better fits that thesis, then explain what kind of research evidence Sarah should look for to support her thesis and provide details from the story Battle Royal that best support that thesis.

DQ2 RACE AND ETHNICITY IN LITERATURE

In David Henry Hwang’s Trying to Find Chinatown, Ronnie says to Benjamin “There’re worlds out there, worlds you haven’t even begun to understand.” What does he mean by this? Using Trying to Find Chinatown and one other literary reading from this week except Battle Royal, explain how Ronnie’s statement is a theme in literature about race and ethnic relations.

Week 7 discussion

DQ1 DEATH IN WAR

Both Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried (pages 101–111) and Randall Jarrell’s Death of the Ball Turret Gunner (page 550) describe a death as a result of war. Yet each is remarkably different in the tone used to describe that death. What are the differences in tone between these two works? How do these differences affect what readers are to learn about the significance of death in war?

DQ2 GRIEF IN LITERATURE

Both Ben Jonson’s On My First Daughter (pages 550–551) and Seamus Heaney’s Mid-Term Break (page 697) are about reconciling oneself to the death of a child. How does each speaker reconcile himself to this death? Or does he reconcile? Does either speaker draw any significance from this death? Compare the attitudes expressed in these two poems with the attitudes about the inevitable death of oneself as portrayed in Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find (pages 484–493) and Emily Dickinson’s Because I Could Not Stop for Death (pages 545–546). How is the grandmother’s behavior when confronted by her own death in the O’Connor story different from the speaker’s attitude about her own death in the Dickinson poem? Do any of these four works agree about the significance of death to the living?

Week 8 discussion

Class, looking back over the Course Objectives for this course, what are you looking forward to learning more about throughout your education and career?

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