devry ltre421 all week course projects latest 2017

| August 31, 2017

Question
Week 4 Course Project

The purpose of a proposal is to get your ideas started, and to do so in a manner that can lead to an effective research paper. Your research proposal will be presented as a sentence outline. As the name suggests, the sentence outline presents complete thoughts in complete sentences as opposed to phrases. In each section of the proposal, choose ideas with the goal of planning your literature project. Use a complete sentence to provide the response to each of the questions below. You can use first person. Use APA documentation for the final section of the proposal to document any sources referenced in your proposal. Remember to put at least two items at any given level of the outline, as shown in this template and the sample proposal.

I. Introduction

A. Topic

1) What is your research question? (Reprint the topic you have chosen from the list of topics in the Course Project page.)

2) What is your working thesis? (It answers your research question and defines the direction of your argument.)

3) What is your angle on the topic? (Your angle is the critical approachyou will use to discuss the literary works.)

B. Literary Works

1) Name the first literary work your paper will discuss. Justify for your reader why this work is suitable for the topic.

2) Name the second literary work your paper will discuss. Justify for your reader why this work is suitable for the topic.

3) [optional] Name any additional literary work your paper will discuss. Justify for your reader why this work is suitable for the topic.

C. Theme

1) What is the primary literary theme in these works? (These are the themes named in the Course Project instructions.)

2) Whatareany secondary or related themes in these works? (Identify other ideas connected with the primary literary theme.)

3) What are some potential opinions and values your paper’s audience may have concerning these themes? (Determine if the audience is likely to take a side or if they may be skeptical or even neutral regarding the themes.)

II. Evidence

A. What research have you gathered so far? (What have you found that supports your purpose and angle?)

B. What research do you need to gather? (What other kinds of information will you need as support? Where will you look to find these sources?)

III. Conclusion (What would you like the readers of your project to understand about the literature you discuss?)

IV. [optional] References if you cite any sources in this proposal (must be correctly formatted according tothe APA Publication Manual).

Week 5 Course Project Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography for [Your Title Here]

To start your annotated bibliography, write an introductory paragraph to gain the attention of your reader and set the context for your research. Start by naming the works of literature you will be discussing and their authors. Provide a brief description of the themes you will be discussing in your paper. You may also want to provide a brief statement about the critical perspective you will be using. Provide your working thesis statement that answers your research question and provides the direction of your argument. The annotated bibliography will include five annotated references and is to include a summary paragraph that summarizes the source and the author’s main points and relevance to your research and the credibility, reliability, and timeliness of the source material.

Put your first alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style.Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibilityand reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Put your second alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style. Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibility and reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Put your third alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style. Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibility and reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Put your fourth alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style. Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibility and reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Put your fifth alphabetical reference here in correct APA format. Consult the textbook or Noodle Toolsfor tips on using APA style. Use a hanging indent paragraph structure; pay attention to capitalization, spacing, italics, and punctuation. Click here for more on Noodle Tools http://library.devry.edu/pdfs/using-NoodleTools.pdf.

Start the summary by stating the main points of the article here. Provide a high-level summary of the author’s main points and assess the credibility and reliability of the source.

Start your assessment here: Next add your comment. The comment should answer such questions as: How will you use the source? Does it clarify or explain a concept related to your topic? Does it support or contrast your thesis? Identify the section of your project where you could include your source.Avoid obvious ideas, such as this article was interesting and will be used in my paper or this source will help me prove my ideas. Instead, be specific about where this source will be used and which ideas it will help to prove. Do not copy and paste anything; instead, summarize ideas in your own words.Explain specifically the type of support that the source will provide and where it can be used in your project.

Before you turn in the assignment, select the review tab from the MS Word toolbar above and click on spelling & grammar. Check each flagged error. Then rename this document using File>Save As and save the file with your last name.first.Anno Bib.doc. Be sure when it’s graded to read the comments so that you can incorporate improvements into your next assignment.

Week 6 Course Project First Draft

Your Title Goes Here

Start with the attention-grabbing statement. Name the literary works and the authors you will discuss right away. Identify the topic. This idea lets your readers know what your paper is about in general terms. Identify the major theme(s) that your paper will explore. Express the purpose. This idea allows readers to understand why you are talking about these literary works in this way. Clarify the critical approach(s) that you will take in the paper. End with your thesis statement. Be clear and concise about your idea and why it will succeed in enlightening a potential reader on the literary works you discuss.

The topic sentence for section I belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

The topic sentence for section II belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. See the lecture for Week 6 regarding information on what belongs in this section. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

Continue to provide topics and support until you have completed every part of your argument and deployed your evidence.

The final section of the paper is the conclusion. This is not the area just to repeat earlier information. It should also not simply summarize the literature. The conclusion should summarize the paper’s main arguments and demonstrate that the thesis has been proved.

As the last page of this document, include your references. Format each entry using alphabetical order of each author’s last name, or the first word of the title (excluding a, an, and the) if no author exists. Be sure to have each entry start flush left; then the second and each subsequent line must be hanging indented. You also need to see the example below.

Before you turn in the paper, go to review above and click on spelling and grammar. Not every error will be flagged, and some that are flagged as errors are actually correct. So this spell checker is not foolproof. Also, check your page count, which includes only the text pages, not the title page or references page. If you have fewer than five full pages of text, it’s a red flag that not enough information exists. If you go above the suggested page count, that’s OK as long as you’re concise, not repeating yourself, and including only relevant information. Then saveas your last name.first.research.draft.1.doc. Put it in the Dropbox as an attachment so that if done correctly, a paper icon appears next to the assignment. Be sure when it’s graded to read the comments so that you can improve for your next draft.

References

Put your sources cited in-text above here in alphabetical order, starting with the first line flush left and hanging indent of the second and each subsequent line. Each in-text citation should have a corresponding reference entry here. Below are examples of references from the course anthology textbook. The first is an example of a reference for a chapter in the literature text. The second is an example of a literature reference. The second is an example of a chapter reference.

Roberts, E. V., & Zweig, R. (2015). Chapter 25: Critical approaches important in

the study of literature. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An

Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., pp. 1566-1588). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Robinson, E. A. (2015). Richard Cory. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.),

Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., p.

590). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. (Original work published 1897)

Week 7 Course Project Final Paper

Start with the attention-grabbing statement. Name the literary works and the authors you will discuss right away. Identify the topic.This idea lets your readers know what your paper is about in general terms. Identify the major theme(s) that your paper will explore. Express the purpose.This idea allows readers to understand why you are talking about these literary works in this way. Clarify the critical approach(s) that you will take in the paper. End with your thesis statement. Be clear and concise about your idea and why it will succeed in enlightening a potential reader on the literary works you discuss.

The topic sentence for section I belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

The topic sentence for section II belongs right here. This sentence mirrors the first reason or concept you are discussing and comes directly from the thesis statement. Develop this section in one to two paragraphs. See the lecture for Week 6 regarding information that belongs in this section. When you include paraphrases, summaries, or quotations from your sources, include citations.

Continue to provide topics and support until you have completed every part of your argument and deployed your evidence.

The final section of the paper is the conclusion. This is not the area just to repeat earlier information. It should also not simply summarize the literature. The conclusion should summarize the paper’s main arguments and demonstrate that the thesis has been proved.

As the last page of this document, include your references. Format each entry using alphabetical order of each author’s last name, or the first word of the title (excluding a, an, and the) if no author exists. Be sure to have each entry start flush left; then the second and each subsequent line must be hanging indented. You also need to see the example below.

Before you turn in the paper, go to review above and click on spelling and grammar. Not every error will be flagged, and some that are flagged as errors are actually correct. So this spell checker is not foolproof. Also, check your page count, which includes only the text pages, not the title page or references page. If you have fewer than five full pages of text, it’s a red flag that not enough information exists. If you go above the suggested page count, that’s OK as long as you’re concise, not repeating yourself, and including only relevant information. Then saveas . . your last name.first.research.draft.1.doc. Put it in the Dropbox as an attachment so that if done correctly, a paper icon appears next to the assignment. Be sure when it’s graded to read the comments so that you can understand the grade your paper received.

References

Put your sources cited in-text above here in alphabetical order, starting with the first line flush left and hanging indent of the second and each subsequent line. Each in-text citation should have a corresponding reference entry here. Below are examples of references from the course anthology textbook. The first is an example of a reference for a chapter in the literature text. The second is an example of a literature reference. The second is an example of a chapter reference.

Roberts, E. V., & Zweig, R. (2015). Chapter 25: Critical approaches important in

the study of literature. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.), Literature: An

Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., pp. 1566-1588). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Robinson, E. A. (2015). Richard Cory. In E. V. Roberts & R. Zweig (Eds.),

Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing (6th, Comp. ed., p.

590). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. (Original work published 1897)

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